North Side Hip Hop | Photography
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Photography

CKLN 88.1fm Hip Hop History (2011-002PHO)

On saturday Feb 12, 2011 CKLN studios in Toronto became home to a legendary celebration of three generations of hip hop history.  As one of the first stations in Canada to have a radio show dedicated to hip hop music, CKLN has been bumping the boom-bap since the mid 1980s.  From the Fanatasic Voyage to the PowerMove Show, to the Real Frequency Show to the Mixtape Massacre, saturday afternoons from 1-4 has been a staple in Toronto hip hop culture since I had tricycle.  Check out some pics from this momentous day.

 

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A Great Day in Toronto (2008-001POS)

Great Day in Toronto

August 10 2008

Following a summer of documenting Toronto hip hop history, Manifesto Community Projects invited the hip hop community to be a part of a reenactment of the Great Day in Harlem photo from 1958. The original photo taken for Esquire magazine captured 57 Jazz musicians in Harlem and featured greats like Theolonous Monk, Charles Mingus and Count Basie. The Great Day in Toronto photo captured three generations of hip hoppers from tiny bboys to emerging Turntablists to legends from the 1980s. Regrettably, the photo is missing some notables, especially those members of the community that remain in spirit, Frankie/Black-I and MC Kwesro.

An impressive assortment of individuals came out for the photo including Graph Writers, Producers, Label reps and Documentarians. The day was nostalgic, filled with old stories, intricate dap designed in the ‘90s and the amusing cross the room holler, “yo guy where’s the money you owe me!” Many participated in interviews conducted by the Manifesto documentary team, vividly rekindling quickly fading memories—memories resuscitated by the presence of old friends. Importantly, the diversity of peoples that came out for the photo demonstrated the depth and strength of Toronto’s hip hop community.